Services Expeditions

HMSTC Discoverer

Day 24, 14 Nov 17

Leaving St Vincent

After arriving in St Lucia, it is now difficult to sum up what has been a fantastic experience; challenging and rewarding in equal measure. Sailing the Atlantic is an extraordinary achievement, something many sailors dream of for years, but few fulfil. Interestingly for the military, the preparation is akin to deploying on operations – prepare for the worst (tropical storm!), train hard, and also mentally prepare yourself.

To take 8 novices within the crew of 16 and safely arrive reflects on the crew’s determination and attitude – an ability to accept the unfamiliar environment and operate well outside their comfort zone. What made for pleasant sailing temperatures gave us a nightmare below decks – not dissimilar to the inside of armoured vehicles in the desert. Key qualities of resilience and determination were tested thoroughly when temperatures for sleeping and cooking reached 35 degrees!  All whilst crowded in a portacabin sized space with 16 people… As we approached the Caribbean, a spinnaker drop in the pitch black at night, with the wind rising, confirmed to me the crew of Discoverer had come a long way. A billowing 280 square metres of sail brought smartly down; 10 different tasks fulfilled by 16 people simultaneously, executed with just one initial word of command. Teamwork in a nutshell!

The reward was obvious; landfall and a few days in the Caribbean. But the journey was no mean feat and as a tool to develop resilience, teamwork and confidence to operate outside our comfort zone, you could do no better. A huge thanks must go to the PACIFIC LONGBOW team and JSASTC who have made this exercise possible, and the units who have supported this leg.

Capt Phil Caswell REME
1 R IRISH

St Vincent

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW  Leg 2  - Day 23, 13 Nov 17

Walilabou Bay on St Vincent

After another days sailing we had reached our third stop of Walilabou Bay on St Vincent. This is where they filmed pirates of the Caribbean, and some of the locals proudly told us how they had been in the film. It was great to see a difference in each of the islands, with their different cultures and how they lived off the land which would involve going up mountains to find fruits or tend to their crops. Whilst we were there we had the chance to visit a beautiful waterfall with the help of a local called Kenny who took us on the 30 min walk up there, as we were walking we spotted a nutmeg tree so Kenny showed us how to get the nutmeg down which involved throwing sticks at the tree to knock them down. There were also some contraptions on the way that seemed to be made out of car parts, a really interesting explore ashore! A browse round the remaining buildings that had been built for the film finished off an interesting day, before we set sail for our final destination, St Lucia. Walilabou Bay on St Vincent

Cfn Kyle Thornton          
Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW  Leg 2  - Day 22, 12 Nov 17

Waterfall Walilabou Bay on St Vincent

 

calm achorage at Tobago_Cays

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via 3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

Track the yacht at https://my.yb.tl/hmstvdiscoverer

Land is still a sight for sore eyes, and I will savour this feeling of achievement for as long as possible.  This incredible trip has taught me not to take anything for granted, and also to appreciate the little luxuries in life.  Particularly exciting for me is the thought of not having to cut up plastic to stuff in a bin, sleeping for longer than 4 hours at a time and bathroom facilities!

The hardship was all made instantly worthwhile when we pulled into Tobago Cays, a stunningly beautiful collection of tiny islands with white sand, deep turquoise water and palm trees – the quintessential desert island.  The whole crew were ferried to the beach and spent the morning looking for turtles and admiring the iguanas, and then we had a BBQ buffet of lobster before setting sail for Bequia, our next stop on the journey northwards.

Bequia is a tiny island with a small town nestled on the hillside, and it provided us with a perfect place to anchor and hop ashore to enjoy the reggae band.  The crew are happy and looking forward to more exploring.

Lt Archie Nicholson
KRH

Tobago Cays

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW  Leg 2  - Day 21, 11 Nov 17

Rememberance on HMSTC Discoverer

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via 3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

Track the yacht at https://my.yb.tl/hmstvdiscoverer

Finally, the day we have all been waiting for - landfall on Union Island!  Because we arrived at night, the skipper chose not to take us into the main harbour in the dark – too many reefs and other hazards to negotiate!  Instead, we anchored in a small bay on the other side of the island, waiting for the sun to rise.  It was a memorable dawn, not just because the boat had finally stopped moving, but also because we took the opportunity to commemorate Armistice Day with a short, but moving ceremony on the foredeck.  Everyone gathered, wearing their red crew T-shirts, and after a short introduction by Lt Col Andrew Mould, the skipper led the crew in reciting ‘Binyon’s lines’ (They shall grow not old……).  The youngest crew member, Cfn Kyle Thornton laid a wreath which had been carefully made by LCpl Lily Davies over the previous few days, and the whole crew kept two minutes silence.

The blue Caribbean water was too tempting to miss, so most of the crew jumped in for a quick dip, before getting down to the important business of moving the boat to an anchorage in the main harbour.  Once the boat was secure, it was time to inflate the dinghy and take the crew ashore for the first experience of dry land for nearly 19 days.  A memorable moment for all!

Lt Col Andrew Mould R SIGNALS
Army HQ

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW  Leg 2  - Day 20, 10 Nov 17

Tom

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via 3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

Track the yacht at https://my.yb.tl/hmstvdiscoverer

Today, we saw something momentous. We saw land.  For the first time in 20 days! As the sun rose at 0600hrs in the distance we saw the haze of Barbados Island, and as if they knew our celebration the boat was accompanied by a pod of bottlenose dolphins playing and jumping in the breaking waves at the bow. We watched them for a good 20 minutes before they disappeared and the tone for the day approaching our first stop – Union Island – was set.

The boat has been cleaned up and food stocks counted and organised, the anchor has been hauled up from the fore peak and the dingy for running ashore has been checked and inflated.  Everyone had a giggle at one poor souls’ expense as we teased that the dingy needed to be blown up by hand, before an electric pump was handed over. We shall be anchoring off shore within darkness but we are all excited of the prospect that when we emerge from our cots in the morning we will be greeted with a vista worthy of a post card and able to jump straight into the crystal blue waters and explore, swimming in to the coves and caves of the island before breakfast.

Tomorrow is a day ashore for the entire crew in the small village of Clifton on Union Island, a delicious crew meal in a local restaurant is very much on everyone’s minds as we pack away the 10 tins of spam and 15 tins of peas that were going to be forming our next few meals had our journey taken us any longer.  Be prepared to be inundated from everyone returning home to have many, many photos of paradise!

Sgt Tom Lattimer REME
3 Battalion REME

 

Discoverer

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW LEG 2 – Day 19, 9 Nov 17

 

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via

3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__my.yb.tl_hmstvdiscoverer&d=DwIFaQ&c=SpkS68ZihjmrPEDEws428g&r=v7bGoqpX2bXbEiMTqO1CfF2IN8RuySBOrOiIpDu_Vvc&m=1iehr_Eav5VRq2s4dlh6SI99qqs26TG_gOsHdDaZtyE&s=mdbkMtgN2JwzW_dUXgYD9XcV7frYR31PbArJtxS3NRc&e=

So, today couldn’t have started any better; just after finishing my washing and hanging it out to dry at 0630, thinking that the sun would be out shortly, I looked up to see a huge raincloud billowing across the ocean right towards us. However, a five minute drenching just before breakfast wasn’t all that bad, as it gave you the false sense of feeling clean and refreshed before going below decks to be doused in sweat! Breakfast was pancakes, with porridge, toast and muesli as a side. A broken few hours of sleep followed shortly after, before we went back on watch from 12-2. Mother Watch duties were looming, but on the lighter side a really good quiz was put on by Lily. The boat was split into two teams and a fierce competition followed, with the side I was on winning overall. Some extra wind and a few more showers came later in the afternoon which was a good thing as the average boat speed sharply increased! Unfortunately this wind was too much for the spinnaker and in moonlight we executed a perfect drop worthy of an experienced racing crew. The current situation is that we sit only 100 miles away from Union Island, our destination in the Grenadines, and we are set for an early Saturday morning arrival on which is a great morale booster for everyone.

Pte Jordan Morris RLC
1 CS BN REME

 

Day 18, 8 Nov 17 Discoverer Leg 2 and the Motley Crew

Verse 2

By Sgt Jack Baldwin

Their voyage began, to traverse The Atlantic,
Their steering was dodgy ,and the sail changes frantic,
The crew still needed to master some skills
So next on the agenda, ‘Man over board’ drills.
For Kyle and Jordan, it proved quite a trial,
They both threw the rope, but it missed by a mile!
Words of encouragement flowed from the others,
With cries of ‘You Muppets’ and ‘Get a grip Chuckle Brothers’!
Tom and Ash came next to the fore,
But it soon transpired they couldn’t hit a barn door!
Once they got rescuing off to a tee

It was time to head out to the open sea.

Each of the crew had their own little bunk
And the heat was stifling, so the boat soon stunk
Ship’s Doc, Craig, due to night sweats was drenched,
So he self-diagnosed, and slept on a bench .
Lily and Mark, they slept not a wink,
Their patience with sailing pushed right to the brink,
Andrew stayed calm and guided them through,
Passing on knowledge to his eager crew.

They took turns on watch, through daytime and night,
4 on 4 off, Mother watch, no respite
The stags were relentless, but the crew stayed alert,
The bunks were like ovens, so sleep came in spurts.
Jordan got hot, Kyle got burned,
They got smothered in sun cream… Lesson learned.

Mother watch cooked up some tasty treats,
Based mainly around Chorizo type meats.
Meticulous Matt, in his light hearted way,
Threatened keel hauling, if a haribo went stray.

Diana in media was well above par,
Directing a movie, making Archie a star,
Because they all grafted, and worked really hard,
The cruel skipper relented and allowed a reward,
After days of grime, sweat and sun lotion, They were finally granted a dip in the ocean.
They lined up for the rope swing to take the big leap,
Into clear blue waters, that were 4 miles deep.
Somedived gracefully, Some went splat!
And they ALL saw a completely different side to Matt.
Daz gave instructions on how to jump in…
Swing out from the pulpit, let go, and then swim,
But Kyle decided that wasn’t for him…
He thought he’d show off and keep hold of the float,
And he promptly smashed into the side of the boat.

15 days in and they dreamt of dry land,
The Atlantic was vast, relentless and bland,
2 days to push to ‘Paradise Found’
They longed just to put both their feet on the ground,
The end was nigh, 400 miles more,
What Caribbean wonders lay in store…

Discoverer

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW  Leg 2  - Day 17, 7 Nov 17 Kyle & Jordan

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via 3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__my.yb.tl_hmstvdiscoverer&d=DwIFaQ&c=axaOw2qHyp7zEDNbTjpgYA&r=jA4WOhkmsVupd-44kfRvMogBjYoOgJo7Jm3nd_Buyho&m=uP91_mt2bUqOzjyLSY5Hxnj-fBZx-xUZWcN_OngQRGk&s=vLTtAct52vSKO8A9IGZq0ciUHB8p5Fcwwb-JuWFfp_Q&e=

We are currently 3 days from our final destination to a currently unknown Caribbean island! Over these past couple of weeks we have worked together effectively as a team from putting up spinnakers at the break of daylight to cooking meals (in hard working hot

temperatures) for the rest of the crew. It was a huge task to get to sea and literally be thrown in the deep end and learn the workings of HMSTC Discoverer. Now that we are nearing the end of our voyage we need to prepare the vessel for handing over to the crew of the next leg which involves a three day deep clean, maintenance and repairs to equipment, and a counting of food stock. The challenges we have had to put ourselves through have been hardhitting for all of us; whether it be nonstop working as a watch/mother, living in a confined space with

15 others, dealing with heat and fatigue 24/7, or leaving your families for a month.  I can say it has definitely an eye opener to the opportunities in life that we can grasp onto and a way to test ourselves in a different environment, and we can take away with us these experiences and memories to help us in the future.

Cfn Kyle Thornton          
1 Royal Irish LAD

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW  Leg 2  - Day 16, 6 Nov 17

Fish exercise Pacific Longbow

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via

3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

Track the yacht at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__my.yb.tl_hmstvdiscoverer&d=DwIFaQ&c=SpkS68ZihjmrPEDEws428g&r=v7bGoqpX2bXbEiMTqO1CfF2IN8RuySBOrOiIpDu_Vvc&m=1xT6CcMpkLaaOXn0Mc8spV7JUtMw_yuU8N-mUVlXZ1E&s=1sQZ3OvOxgDCk23nMSgJAj-rxml0520Y4X-xHzWGS8s&e=

Today was a good day; everyone on board was given the chance to reset their morale compass with a swim in the ocean, after 2 weeks of very warm purgatory. In particular, during the last few days we have experienced stifling heat, with no escape below or above deck.  So at 1500, Discoverer’s spinnaker and main sail were taken down in order to bring her to a halt in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. One of the fenders was shackled onto a halyard to form a swing from the mast.

Freedom beckoned in the 4km deep water, although being on deck without a life jacket on was amazing freedom in itself!

First off was WO2 Ash Crampton. He needed no persuasion whatsoever as he flung himself off the bow of the boat and let go of the fender above the ocean. A few more followed. Between the swinging fender, Sgt Jack Baldwin was entering the water with some rather impressive backwards summersaults off the side.

Last but not least, it was my turn. Considering I paraglide, I really shouldn’t be so scared of swinging off a fender into the ocean a couple of meters high… But I was. I was even more terrified of what lay beneath the water. With some light hearted peer pressure, I made my way to the bow and held onto the halyard, knowing if I didn’t do it I would regret it. How many people can say they have sailed the Atlantic Ocean, let alone swam in the middle of it? I took my leap of faith and alas, it was not the height, nor what lay beneath; my shock was in that it was much saltier than expected!

A few more jumps and the fender went back into the forepeak. Sails went back up and Discoverer was back on course towards the Caribbean, all thoroughly refreshed.

Cfn Laura Davies
105 Battalion, 158 Field Company

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW  Leg 2  - Day 15, 5 Nov 17

LCpl Lily Davies
LCpl Lily Davies 1 royal Irish LAD

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via 3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

Track the yacht at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__my.yb.tl_hmstvdiscoverer&d=DwIFaQ&c=axaOw2qHyp7zEDNbTjpgYA&r=jA4WOhkmsVupd-44kfRvMogBjYoOgJo7Jm3nd_Buyho&m=GW1uFZ9suRSWdaTx7pSX74KfD61OsyRRM0kxMGQX15g&s=phZ5iqO5HIl4AJch3dR-lNiO6L9ZBmflRvEaQn7N4IM&e=

We sail into the setting sun at the end of another long day at sea.  I think it’s ten maybe eleven days now since we last saw land. Days have merged, one watch moves into the next and it is easy to lose track of time. All I know is that we are one day closer to our destination, our finish point, one day closer to returning home to our loved ones. We look forward to telling our tales of this remarkable journey.

Especially those of us who have little ones, we look forward to telling them stories and hoping to inspire them to one day go on adventures of their own.

We’ve not seen land, however there is so much beauty in each sunrise and sunset, mesmerizing vistas, almost surreal and worthy of being put onto canvas to admire when we get home. It’s been a few days since we saw the whales breaching and a few days more since dolphins played on our bow but the memory lingers and we hope we will see more before we reach our destination. Sails go up and down, we pull and heave lines and drag the heavy canvases across the deck. Forward, aft, hoist port, ease starboard, help in the snake pit then helm from the stern. All new words and skills we’re learning to sail this boat, all part of our training to qualify as competent crew. The more we learn, the more practice the quicker and easier everything becomes. I think we’re turning into Yachties!

We came onto mother watch today, we’ve just finished tidying up after a chilli full of emotional onions. Now off to bed for a much needed full night’s sleep before we’re up to sort out breakfast for everyone tomorrow.

LCpl Lily Davies
1 Royal Irish LAD

 

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW  Leg 2  - Day 14, 4 Nov 17

Ex Pacific Longbow Crew

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via

3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

Track the yacht at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__my.yb.tl_hmstvdiscoverer&d=DwIFaQ&c=axaOw2qHyp7zEDNbTjpgYA&r=jA4WOhkmsVupd-44kfRvMogBjYoOgJo7Jm3nd_Buyho&m=QtP83et1HdH4UO0UEZ3BseMUGOcxD3AMav_1doxeK9c&s=Rvu_1CxCYslJjYAfoWdJ_iLhu_xLNqmkkeDt8jxSVtY&e=

The night sky – REME 75

Many people this weekend are watching fires burn, their skies alight with explosions and perhaps having a toffee apple or two. Since fires and explosions aren’t particularly welcome in our current situation we decided to do something slightly different. Today we acknowledged the 75th anniversary year of the Corps of the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers with a ‘get-together’ on deck and a delicious cake expertly made and decorated by Cfn Laura Davies. It was a poignant moment to recognise the formation of the Corps.

Now 10 days at sea, settled into our watch routine, these ‘get-togethers’ are ever more important. On watch are on deck ‘driving’, off watch are usually sleeping and mother watch are preparing food or catching up on chores and admin (sleep).  Watches pass each other as we switch roles and at meal times but the only time we’re all together as a crew are at times like this. A time to chat, catch up and regain a perspective on what it is we’re doing.  As mentioned before, our micro society functions by sharing work and developing our own experts on board, ultimately though we’re just a group of 16 people bobbing about on in the ocean. We’re a long way from external help so we take care to look after each other and respect our temporary home. At times we all miss our loved ones and look forward to home and a full night’s sleep, but when together it’s good to remind ourselves what we’re doing and take time to appreciate it.

So this weekend we may not have toffee apples, but we have had cake, no fireworks but no need -our night’s sky ablaze with the moon and stars, and thankfully no bonfires - it’s plenty warm enough on board already! Onward we sail into the great big blue.

Capt Matt Metcalfe
102 Bn REME

 

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW  Leg 2  - Day 13, 3 Nov 17

Dicoverer in Lanzarote

Discoverer in Lanzarote

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via

3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

Track the yacht at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__my.yb.tl_hmstvdiscoverer&d=DwIFaQ&c=SpkS68ZihjmrPEDEws428g&r=v7bGoqpX2bXbEiMTqO1CfF2IN8RuySBOrOiIpDu_Vvc&m=kn3dxx7GOAx_IhmgFqoNWTxl8lXVLSyNxhfNrsNt90U&s=QlV12Ze-xZrxk1vwNLjmOxiQPA9lPgj7_70WqxOdl2Y&e=

Zero six hundred hours.

The rain started as a few flecks of could have been mistaken as ocean spray were it not for the colossal, dark rain clouds hanging above the Atlantic, seemingly adding an air of menace to the squalling gusts pushing the Discoverer through the early morning twilight. The dullness of this morning’s light starkly at odds with the glorious, sky splitting sunrises the crew had become accustomed to over the last

10 days.

And it was whilst the remainder of the crew slept in their bunks below deck that the squall started. Rain attacking the Discoverer, sheeting across her deck and sails, running in torrents along her length before streaming off into the sea; a sea which for all the world looked as if it was boiling as the rain blasted down. Looking from the helm it was clear to see the sway and watch as the Discoverer climbed, surfed and crashed down the rough, almost pointed waves of dark seawater.

The members of white watch worked through the cascading downpour as one; reefing the main sail, changing the foresail and guiding our ship through the squall and flash cloudburst. Lt Archie Nicholson shouted commands back to white watch, one hand for balance, the other ‘four finger’ pointing along the ships’s deck, his confidence and assuredness an anchor against the squall. Beside him, Pte Jordan Morris worked quickly and deftly with the foresail, impervious to the repeated broadsides of sheet rain. Capt Craig Murphy stood in the ship’s ‘snake pit’, implacable against the storm, blind to the tumultuous  deck movements whilst loading, unloading and winding winches. Back, by the helm, Cfn Laura Davies worked the sheets with now practiced grace and sleight of hand.

This was our first rough weather challenge of Leg 2 and we came through it head held high, if a little soggy. This account is all that is documented of Discoverer’s Great Mid Atlantic Squall as, well, we didn’t switch on the GoPro.

 

Capt Craig Murphy RAMC

Ship’s Doctor

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW  Leg 2  - Day 12, 2 Nov 17

Phil Caswell

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via

3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

Track the yacht at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__my.yb.tl_hmstvdiscoverer&d=DwIFaQ&c=axaOw2qHyp7zEDNbTjpgYA&r=jA4WOhkmsVupd-44kfRvMogBjYoOgJo7Jm3nd_Buyho&m=uP91_mt2bUqOzjyLSY5Hxnj-fBZx-xUZWcN_OngQRGk&s=vLTtAct52vSKO8A9IGZq0ciUHB8p5Fcwwb-JuWFfp_Q&e=

Payday and half way!

We celebrated the half way point today with a deck party; extra crisps and treats were prised from Matt the food guardian’s hands, music blared and morale sky rocketed. ETA Caribbean is a mere 7 days away!

Most of us on board did not mark the passing of payday on 31 Oct. At this point of the month, we are usually enjoying the feeling of having just been paid, and perhaps are looking forward to a millionaire’s weekend (!). But for the crew of Discoverer, this event passed unnoticed. Money has no currency with us anymore. ..

Instead, we have begun to value other things. Knowledge is treasured – be practical abilities, or just having the knack to how to make a task easier. Ability to provide morale is another prized skill (e.g. Kyle’s dancing). The ship is too large and complicated for everyone to know about everything, so we are starting to see individual niche skills emerge. Mark has become a bilge pump enthusiast (a future hobby in the making?!). Darren is our weather guru; Ash the mechanical expert. Jack can now repair the plumbing system blindfolded. Lily is very handy with bread making; white watch are party organising experts. As with all successful teams, each team member is recognised for bringing something different and it is a delight to now see various skills emerge and flourish in every member of the crew. It is reassuring to think we are now as close to being self sustaining as we can be; the act of taking a yacht 3000 miles unsupported across an ocean is the perfect vehicle for us to realise that when put to the test, we all can be very capable indeed.

Capt Phil Caswell REME (Skipper)
1 R IRISH

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW, Leg 2, Blog entry, Day 11, 1 Nov 17

Cfn Kyle Thornton REME, 1 Royal Irish LAD

Cfn Kyle Thornton REME, 1 Royal Irish LAD

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via

3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

Track the yacht at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__my.yb.tl_hmstvdiscoverer&d=DwIFaQ&c=axaOw2qHyp7zEDNbTjpgYA&r=jA4WOhkmsVupd-44kfRvMogBjYoOgJo7Jm3nd_Buyho&m=uP91_mt2bUqOzjyLSY5Hxnj-fBZx-xUZWcN_OngQRGk&s=vLTtAct52vSKO8A9IGZq0ciUHB8p5Fcwwb-JuWFfp_Q&e=

Almost officially crossing our half way point in this journey, one of the things we all agreed upon when we came together as a group facing this adventure, was how much we are all hoping to see different sea life as we crossed the Atlantic. Today several members of the crew up on the top deck at the right time were lucky enough to witness a couple of whales breaching out of the water in the distance! We all stood up quickly shouting and pointing and scrabbling for cameras, we saw two breaches of what we believe were sperm whales and this has now led to an official “whale watch” beginning.  Whilst we have already been lucky enough to be accompanied by porpoises and dolphins in our early morning watches, whales are one of the creatures we want to see the most.  Once we reach the halfway point the plan is to stop the boat for a couple of hours  and go swimming, being able to say that you have swum in the Atlantic sea at 5000m deep is not something everyone is able to say.  Originally there was a lot of excitement about this planned stop, however, now seeing the huge whales that are happily inhabiting the vast expanse below us, a couple people are starting to wonder what other things may be down there that they may not want to swim with! Either way, whilst waiting for the wind to pick up a little bit the heat can become testing at the best of times, especially below deck, therefore the prospect of some fun and cooling down is definitely welcome.

Cfn Kyle Thornton REME
1 Royal Irish LAD

PACIFIC LONGBOW, Leg 2, Day 10, 31 Oct 17

Lt Archie Nicholson on KRH s Balaclava day.jpg

Lt Archie Nicholson on KRHs Balaclava day.jpg

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW, Leg 2, Day 10, 31 Oct 17 HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via

3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

Track the yacht at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__my.yb.tl_hmstvdiscoverer&d=DwIFaQ&c=axaOw2qHyp7zEDNbTjpgYA&r=jA4WOhkmsVupd-44kfRvMogBjYoOgJo7Jm3nd_Buyho&m=XPV0VH_ypP3w3UC_tqiJSGaNM1TUevj0Lm0VBeleo5c&s=RWm8_pGV1Dvzjrr-dK4IttPxufol7azIYgt7LYQBJfU&e=

Monday dawned clear and bright; with a freshening breeze as HMSTC Discoverer continued forging her way towards the Caribbean.  For Capt Matt Metcalfe it was particularly memorable; having concluded his service with the regular army, an attestation ceremony was conducted by Lt Col Andrew Mould to mark the beginning of his time with the Army Reserve.  At 21 degrees 30’.511N 026 degrees 54’.424W in the mid-Atlantic, this has surely got to be one of the remotest attestations!  A short time afterwards an investigation was conducted into the chocolate-gate scandal, in order to discover who raided the White Watch sweet box - it was discovered that the culprit was the same flying fish that had launched itself at SSgt Darren Offord, the second mate. Case closed.

Today Sgt Jack Baldwin conducted a valiant repair on a leak to the grey water tank.  It took four hours of fiddling in the bilges of the boat, but he managed it and now we can all shower again (thank goodness!).  We did manage to drag him away to join the Halloween party, and at 1500hrs the costumes were unveiled; some were good, many were bad, all were ugly!  Decorations, party food and games followed with much merriment.  The games ended in a tie between all three watches, and Cfn Kyle Thornton stormed to victory in the tie-break dance-off.

The spinnaker carried the boat all day and we were able to experience some very pleasant sailing.  With food providing such a focal point for every member of the crew, rivalry is growing as to which watch can produce the best meals.  Cfn Laura Davies pulled it out of the bag today with an excellent starter of garlic butter dough balls, followed by Pte Jordan Morris and Capt Craig Murphy on the roast chicken and Laura produced a coffee and chocolate cake to finish.  Lt Archie Nicholson tackled the mountain of washing up and provided his usual cavalry panache and joie de vivre.  Hussar!

Lt Archie Nicholson KRH
White watch leader

Day 9, 30 Oct: Discoverer Leg 2 And The Motley Crew By Sgt Jack Baldwin Verse One

Jack Baldwin

Sgt Jack Baldwin preparing to climb the mast and conduct a rig insepection

 Select  16 ?
The Chosen few ?
Intrepid explorers ?
Motley crew ?
Who knew ?
What wild adventures lay in wait
For these 16 strangers, drawn by fate.

At one am the moment came
To leave the murk of Gosport’s rain,
Through Luton Airport’s departure doors,
To sunnier climes, To distant shores.

At Puerto Calero, Discovery awaited,
Its newest of crews feeling truly elated,
Early next day they were blessed beyond hopes
With Captain Phil Caswell to show them the ropes.
Next came the ship’s mates, Darren and Daz
To show them the difference between Forepeak and Laz.
Due to these legends, they were safe, they all knew
With Day Skippers, Coastals and Competent Crew,

A handful of novices made up the rest,
Who hoped they could cope, if it came to the test.
Some were experienced,
Some not very,
Mark’s claim to fame,
Was a P+O ferry!

The next few days, they rapidly passed,
They victualled and loaded,
And hauled Jack up the mast.

Then came sail training, with a gentle sea swell,
And suddenly Archie didn’t feel very well!
Laura crawled round trying to throw up her spleen,
Archie, like his t-shirt, turned luminous green,
From Mark and Kyle, they heard not a peep,
Lily closed down, and her brain went to sleep!

Then 2 days later,
With the crew feeling grotty,
Destiny called,
And they slipped Lanzarote…

By Sgt Jack Baldwin

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW Leg 2 - Day 8, 29 Oct 17

2Lt Diana Pitts AGC

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via

3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

Track the yacht at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__my.yb.tl_hmstvdiscoverer&d=DwIFaQ&c=axaOw2qHyp7zEDNbTjpgYA&r=jA4WOhkmsVupd-44kfRvMogBjYoOgJo7Jm3nd_Buyho&m=ajW9kpClQrLEkdLIlLFM6DMl4WNQybq4hOwu9iiUiwk&s=pqSCFzNj5qMLePdDpjrbqD_NmeoFxoWYx1dE-aaVNoM&e=

 

With routine now well and truly established, and the watches rolling in to each other seamlessly, unavoidably the boat is now being put through her paces having a crew living on board. Daily wear and tear is taking its toll on our systems and repairs are something we are now dealing with on a daily basis. Although it now appears obvious thinking about it, to be a successful sailor you really have to be a jack of all trades and able to turn your hand at fixing most things technical – and have a little bit of inventive genius in other areas.

800 nautical miles off shore when something breaks you have only yourself to rely upon to keep going as we found out today.  At 0800hrs this morning our generator stopped working.  The generator is a huge life line to our boat, it provides power for all ships systems such as our fresh water maker, water pumps, electricity (therefore nav systems), lights etc. This forced the boat into ‘hard routine’ whilst the engineer looked at fixing it. Hard routine first and foremost means no wastage of water in any way as we were no longer able to produce our own, washing was therefore forbidden which was not welcome news in 35 degree heat! WO2 Ash Crampton of Blue Watch was an armoured vehicle mechanic for 16 years and was able to identify that the impeller that pumps the sea water around the generator for cooling had disintegrated, and he was able to replace it. The boat holds more than

1 spare part on board for many repairs such as this (we have 2 further spare impellers for example) which show cases just how important it is to be able to think ahead and stock the spare parts before voyage, and then importantly knowing how to conduct the repairs. Without doubt something else will need repairs, however after today I shan’t think that anyone will panic when they hear a system is down….

 

By 2Lt Diana Pitts AGC

22 Engr Regt

 

Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW Leg 2, Day 7- 28 Oct 17

Capt Craig Murphy on exercise Pacific Longbow

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via 3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

Track the yacht at https://my.yb.tl/hmstvdiscoverer

Track the yacht at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__my.yb.tl_hmstvdiscoverer&d=DwIFaQ&c=SpkS68ZihjmrPEDEws428g&r=v7bGoqpX2bXbEiMTqO1CfF2IN8RuySBOrOiIpDu_Vvc&m=60Si4wnyiEQEZz-g24DFO36V2KBkKrZvxkubQNMnAiI&s=S__lEBiddQpZvXawZ8pG7vSBeyl0KUYJAMZ5-IPQhHM&e

Position: 700nm SW of the Canaries. Please note we are having problems with yellowbrick which may not be tracking us correctly.

In the early hours of the morning with the black of night all around and the only light on deck being the hard, almost menacing red glow from the compass light, a vast structure adorned with running lights became visible off to starboard.

Although our automatic identification system had been tracking this huge cargo ship for many hours, it became clear that a slight course correction was needed, and we passed safely past at a distance of roughly a mile. All on deck watched the heavily laden, monolithic behemoth as it cut through the water past us, seemingly silent in the darkness to a backdrop of an endlessly star filled sky.

It had been 3 days since we last saw land or any other ships and with nothing else on the radar ahead, this may be the last other vessel we see for several weeks. This realisation is not lost on the crew of the Discoverer; in fact it has shaped us all in how closely we must work together and for each other over the coming few weeks.

As if to emphasise this point, the waste water drainage system from the galley started to malfunction. Step forward WO1 Mark Walker, who set about identifying the faulty valve and repairing it with the methodical, precise and stoic determination of seasoned REME tradesman.

Steady ship routine continues and spirits are high on-board, despite the searing heat both on deck but especially below. Red watch really raised the bar with their mother watch duties by baking fresh ciabatta bread and a fruit loaf for lunch. White watch took over these duties after lunch and prepared a tasty pasta carbonarra, working in the heat of the galley to ensure all on-board were well fed. In the early evening we had some companions on our journey in the shape of a small pod of dolphins leaping alongside, much to the amusement of blue watch.

Discoverer is now just over 500 nautical miles from the next waypoint which will see us catch the trade winds and clear straight for St Lucia – still some 2,400 nautical miles away. The mood on-board is positive and determined, with plenty good humour. We continue to learn about our ship and working alongside one another as our journey carries on.

Capt Craig Murphy RAMC
Ship’s Doctor

Calm sunset

Discoverer Leg 2 - Blog of Red watch Day 6, 27 Oct 2017.

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via

3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

Track the yacht at https://my.yb.tl/hmstvdiscoverer

Position: 500nm SW of the Canaries. Please note we are having problems with yellowbrick which may not be tracking us correctly.

Today was a fantastic start; in fact, it couldn’t have started any better. Dolphins! Our first sighting of the elegant sea creature and it was amazing. Gliding through the sea alongside the boat first thing in the morning was a wakeup call you definitely don’t see when you open your curtains back in the UK.

Only 3 days into the actual sailing phase of the expedition, and already the days and nights have merged into one continual cycle of routine.  One seems unaware of day or date, but rather operates only to the shift patterns established across 3 watches.  However, spirits remain high and attention focused as individual confidence and experience grows with every sail change!

The crew, even though pooled across the spectrum of the Armed Forces now all take their share of responsibility at the helm (day and night).  A position not to be scoffed at considering the level of expertise required as well as the level of responsibility the position holds. Moreover, the entire crew continue to display good judgement in every aspect of sailing and competence is growing.

To close, Red watch consisting of Lily, Mark, Andrew and Jack now move onto the Mother Watch, responsible in ensuring the crew are fed, pampered, and watered. In this regard, the culinary competition is high however; there is an anchor within Red watch in Mark not knowing how to boil an egg?  Every day is a learning day; Mark and the crew can look forward to a Michelin star meal prepared in a kitchen the size of a down stairs loo!

WO1 (ASM) Mark Walker DSEME
& LCpl Lily Davies 1 Royal Irish

Discoverer Leg 2 – Day 5, 26 Oct 17.

Day 5 HMSTC Discoverer

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote – the Caribbean via
3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME’s 75th anniversary celebrations.

So, the day is Friday 27th October 2017 and it’s currently 0300 in the morning. The sea state is very calm and White Watch is nearing the end of the second of their four hour rotations. The watches are broken down into three colours (White, Blue & Red) consisting of two groups of 4 and a 5 which is made up of a watch leader, a comp crew and novices. I am personally part of White Watch (Jordan) and my watch consists of Archie, Laura and Craig; I think as a collective we are a pretty chilled out watch who like to keep morale high and have a good time.

The last 24 hours saw Blue Watch take the lead of mother watch, taking over from us at 1400. Mother watch is in charge of making food and keeping the galley clean, they made a superb Thai curry for dinner which was followed up by a fruit cocktail dessert. Mother watch to me can only be described as a torrid 24 hour period in which you sweat half of your bodily fluids out while trying to make dinner over a hot stove while the boat is rocking and the temperature of a sauna with very little air flow, and if you think that’s bad enough then you then have to wash up afterwards which takes the best part of an hour. Sea sickness for a handful of people is still lingering around but I think the majority have come to grips with the motion now. The scene in the galley has also come to look more like a fruit and veg store than a place to prepare and eat your food as a large amount of it is starting to go off and we are attempting to prolong its life by hanging it up.

The other two watches take it in turns to complete a 48 or 24 hour stint, depending on when you came off mother watch, working in a four on, four off rotation, and they are either working on deck keeping the yacht sailing, doing everything they can to keep a consistent speed of seven or more knots or there eating or sleeping. Anyway, I’m going to sleep now because it is nearing the end of my shift and I am really quite tired due to the lack of sleep from the previous four hours thanks to the insane amount of heat and engine noise!

By Pte Jordan Morris RLC
1 Bn REME

 

Discoverer Leg 2 - Day 4, Wed 25 Oct 16

Learning the ropes – A Hawk in the Atlantic

“Forward, the Light Brigade!

Charge for the guns!” he said

Into the Valley of Death

Rode the six hundred.

The morning of 25th October dawned clear with hardly a cloud in the sky.  The calmness was only broken by the stirring sound of the King’s Royal Hussars regimental quick march as Lt Archie Nicholson, the lone cavalryman amongst the mostly REME yacht, woke the crew with a warm cup of (notional) gunfire per person.

As well as being the day that HMSTC Discoverer embarked on leg 2 of Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW, it also marks the anniversary of the Charge of the Light Brigade, a glorious demonstration of courage and bravery by the most dashing cavalry regiments that Britain has to offer.  The quick march sounded at various points throughout the day and the crew were treated to a rendition of Alfred Lord Tennyson’s poem as the sun went down.

The Disco was a hive of activity from early reveille until 0900hrs, when it finally slipped moorings and set sail, next stop – the Caribbean!!  First on the list of activities was raising the main sail, a simple task that is surprisingly complicated for a crew that are new to the boat and new to each other.  No doubt we will all be experts by the time we reach the Leeward Isles!  We then practiced man overboard drills, a very important skill that we hope will go unused.

That explains the odd squiggles on the map for anyone following us that closely!  Next up we had a medical brief and a sailing brief, before settling into the ‘battle rhythm’ that will be our routine for the next 2-3 weeks.

For White Watch, that meant taking over Mother Watch duties at 1400hrs and preparing to cook the first hot meal for the whole crew whilst at sea – challenge accepted!  Capt Craig Murphy and Cfn Laura Davies duly climbed into their oilskins and sweated in trousers and boots, over three hobs, for an hour in 35 degree heat.  They created a lovely meal of stir fry chicken with cashews and peppers, and mashed biscuit over yoghurt and honey.  It was then down to the watch leader and Tpr Jordan Morris to tackle the mountain of washing up… As night routine sets in we continue steadily eat up the miles as we head to join the trade winds, an ancient route travelled by everyone from tradesmen to pirates, and now us.  Day one at sea and everyone is still smiling; long may it continue!

 

By Lt Archie Nicholson
KRH

Discoverer Blog Day 3, 24 Oct 17

Busy victualling activity

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote to the Caribbean via 3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME's 75th anniversary celebrations. 

Track the yacht at https://my.yb.tl/hmstvdiscoverer

Tuesday, and our final full day in Lanzarote.  After finally finishing the loading of stores, we were waiting for the arrival of the refrigerator repair technician.  Fortunately, the fault was easy to fix (a simple question of regassing the system), and even better, he arrived an hour earlier than promised. The result - a fridge that will keep our butter cool all the way to St Lucia!

We then made our way back out to sea for a final training session, to prove our readiness ready to begin our voyage first thing tomorrow morning.  In light winds, all three watches were put through their paces of tacking, gybing, taking reefs in the mainsail and shaking them out. The result - a tired, but cheerful crew.  Despite a light swell out at sea, no-one showed signs of sea-sickness.  A great omen for our departure tomorrow! 

Dinner was a homemade quiche, presented by chef Matt.  Delicious!   Even those members of the crew who weren’t keen on the vegetables had a go. Well done Lily for trying peas again after all those years.  

So, time for a final night alongside, and a last chance for shorebased admin (did anyone mention how good the showers are at the marina).  Tomorrow morning will be an early start, and we hope to be putting to sea just after 0800.  The only thing stopping is leaving earlier is that we need to wait for the local restaurant to open so we can get our frozen meat out of their freezer!  Roll on tomorrow morning.

Lt Col Andrew Mould
R Signals

Discoverer Blog Day 2, 23 Oct 17

 Busy victualling activity

Busy victualling activity

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote to the Caribbean via 3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME's 75th anniversary celebrations. The leg 2 crew have just arrived on board and are busy preparing for the crossing. 

Track the yacht at https://my.yb.tl/hmstvdiscoverer

Before slipping to begin a lengthy voyage, an admin day is critical. Not only to ensure that the boat is fit to sail and any necessary repairs have been undertaken, but to pack the boat with provisions such as food, equipment and supplies for the crew – this is referred to as ‘victualling’ in the sailing world.

With a crew of 16 and with an estimated voyage on between 17 – 20 days, the amount of provisions are calculated by the longest predicted days of crossing (20 days) and then an additional 20%. The logistics of sourcing such a large amount of produce in a foreign country without many resources to hand (and not speaking the language) is a huge challenge!

The way Leg 2 crew handled this was by renting a hire car for the day and identifying the largest supermarkets within a 10km radius. A team of 2 plus a driver then made 5 or so trips in and out of the marina with vast shopping lists that took 2 working days to compose.  The rest of the crew then carried all the produce on board the boat and carried out the process of portioning, bagging, labelling, waterproofing and stowing all the food and equipment. The detail that went into stowage included drawing maps of the kitchen and storage areas throughout the boat for easy identification of every item single during the crossing. A blip in the estimation of needs has left us with an abnormally large amount of Dijon mustard! The sheer amount of food needed for the crossing, and the time and effort it takes to organise, cannot be underestimated.

The admin continued until fairly late into the evening, and with the kitchen not quite fully packed and organised, the crew agreed that it would be prudent to have our evening meal in a local restaurant. The more the boat appears to be ready the more excited we all are to set sail!

By 2LT Diana Pitts AGC
22 Engr Regiment

Discoverer Blog Day 1, 22 Oct 17

Discoverer Day 2

Discoverer Blog Day 1, 22 Oct 17

 

HMSTC Discoverer is embarking on an Army level round the world adventurous sail training expedition, Ex PACIFIC LONGBOW. Currently, the yacht is on its second leg, from Lanzarote to the Caribbean via 3000 miles of the Atlantic. Leg 2 is led by the REME and is proudly part of the REME's 75th anniversary celebrations. The leg 2 crew have just arrived on board and are busy preparing for the crossing. 

Track the yacht at https://my.yb.tl/hmstvdiscoverer

#Myfirstdayout... I've been on fishing boats, I've raced in regattas, I've even worked on Ben Ainslie's Americas Cup catamaran... But nothing could have prepared me for #myfirstdayout on Discoverer. She helped me discover just how bad my sea legs were, after spending 4 hours feeling quite ill! Today, I also found my hero; another crew member who kindly held back my hair as I chundered into the waves, providing me with a wedgie to remember in the process of keeping me secure on the boat whilst allowing the decks to stay clean. To be fair on us all, it was a choppy day and although I was the first person to break the chunder dam, I felt less ashamed when a watchleader projectile vomited from a yellow face, 1 foot from my own.

It was white watches's motherwatch today, where they are responsible for cooking. Breakfast went swimmingly (no pun intended) as we satisfied everyone's tastebuds with pancakes, whilst turning the cabin kitchen into a scene from Narcos.... 

After breakfast we had a lesson to tie anyone's brain into knots; knots. We learnt 6 knots, 2 of which I remember, before prepping the boat for #myfirstdayout.

Back to main scene of the story... The aim of #myfirstdayout was in order to practise man overboard drills, hoisting sails, tacking, gybing and reefing, all achieved successfully! Then back to the harbour to utilise the docking procedure we had practiced before leaving. 

All in all, it was a fantastic day, only slightly compromised by the human brain's inability to cope on the water. Within a few days, I am sure all that everyone will have found their sea legs!  We are looking forward to setting off later in the week, once we have completed the shopping and some more training over the next few days....

By Cfn Laura Davies
105 Bn REME

 

 

phil brown

AOSC Contact

ASA Chief Instructor Offshore
& Manager Army Offshore Sailing Centre

Capt (Retd) Phil Brown
ASA Chief Instructor Offshore

Army Offshore Sailing Centre
Sword, Building 100 (Top Floor)
Fort Blockhouse
Haslar Road
Gosport
Hants  PO12 2AB

Email: asa-offshore@sailarmy.co.uk

Mil: 9380 65457
Civ: 02392 765457
Fax: 9380 65328

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